Deadouts when using acid cloths

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6
8
Marlborough
Experience
Commercial
We're in Marlborough and have also had our worst year of deadouts in 22 year2 of beekeeping. We used Bayvarol after the honey was taken off and some hives got acid cloths instead, as an experiment. The cloths worked well initially, with fat healthy hives to winter down. We noticed a lot of varroa still in the strip treated hives and wondered about a failed batch of strips? Any other thoughts or evidence out there on that? Several other local beeks have mentioned the same situ.
Last month we found a lot of deadouts or small clusters surviving, but many with good feed still on, unrobbed. We reduced the live hives down to single box hives, reshuffled frames, added new cloths and hoped for the best next visits.
 

Sailabee

BOP Club
1,235
1,289
North Auckland
Experience
Hobbyist
Going back to the OP, the 'acid cloths' many seem to have problems with, particularly when just laying on top of the frames, so that is why many started the using it in strip between the frames for better contact with the bees.
 
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2
3
Wellington
Experience
Hobbyist
Years ago we used to have an apiary right beside huge power pylons and it made no difference to the bees at all. There have been stories for years about electric fences et cetera and I have yet to see any problems with any sort of electrical field. As for your treatment is not working I documented resistance to synthetic pyrethroids over two years ago . They still work in some areas but not in others. In the initial phases of resistance you will get partial control and hives will survive the winter or not depending on how partial that control was.
What treatments do you use [recommend] .. ?
 
5,530
5,854
canterbury
Experience
Commercial
We're in Marlborough and have also had our worst year of deadouts in 22 year2 of beekeeping. We used Bayvarol after the honey was taken off and some hives got acid cloths instead, as an experiment. The cloths worked well initially, with fat healthy hives to winter down. We noticed a lot of varroa still in the strip treated hives and wondered about a failed batch of strips? Any other thoughts or evidence out there on that? Several other local beeks have mentioned the same situ.
Last month we found a lot of deadouts or small clusters surviving, but many with good feed still on, unrobbed. We reduced the live hives down to single box hives, reshuffled frames, added new cloths and hoped for the best next visits.
Dud queens ......
 

Sailabee

BOP Club
1,235
1,289
North Auckland
Experience
Hobbyist
What treatments do you use [recommend] .. ?
Until you have had bees for over two years, I suggest you stick to using the plastic strips, exactly as the blurb says to, making sure that during the treatment time that you check the strips are still where new brood is being laid, and if the brood shifts, also shift the strips.
 
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