Newly caught swarm and queen cells

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Sefton
Experience
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Hi

I caught a swarm a week ago and placed it in an Ecrotek nuc box whilst I assessed the colony for any disease.

Checked today and I couldn’t locate the queen there were some eggs but very little (and two eggs in some cells).

There are a number of queen cells formed, some appear to be swarm cells, whilst others are in the middle of the frame so supercedure cells.

Should I remove any of these cells? I’m thinking keep the supercedure and remove swarm.

Any advice gratefully received.

Thanks

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Alastair

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Got a pic of the eggs? You'll need to be quick those queen cells are close to hatching. How many queen cells?
 
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Josh

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Would it be “typical” for a caught swarm to swarm? No congestion, no stores to draw on, and needs time to build up again.

Could this not be a situation of old queen has swarmed, now ready to be superseded?
 
  • Agree
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Mummzie

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it might just be the photo, but those cappings look older than they should be for a last week swarm. Can you be more sure of the dates?- that will help to age the Qcells too.
 
10
1
Sefton
Experience
Hobbyist
Got a pic of the eggs? You'll need to be quick those queen cells are close to hatching. How many queen cells?
Thanks, no I don’t have any photos of the eggs I’m afraid. There are about five queen cells. Advice from others on a Facebook group was to just leave as is. Is this the right thing to do? thanks
 
10
1
Sefton
Experience
Hobbyist
Would it be “typical” for a caught swarm to swarm? No congestion, no stores to draw on, and needs time to build up again.

Could this not be a situation of old queen has swarmed, now ready to be superseded?
Thanks, I’ve been advised to leave as is and let the bees sort it out. Hopefully all will be well.
 
10
1
Sefton
Experience
Hobbyist
it might just be the photo, but those cappings look older than they should be for a last week swarm. Can you be more sure of the dates?- that will help to age the Qcells too.
Thanks yes I took capped brood frame from another hive on the advice of a beekeeper, I’m thinking perhaps I didn’t see the queen cells developing hence why they look more advanced, I’m presuming this will just have accelerated the process of getting a queenright hive?
 

Alastair

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no I don’t have any photos of the eggs I’m afraid. There are about five queen cells. Advice from others on a Facebook group was to just leave as is. Is this the right thing to do? thanks

Without looking at the eggs I can't tell you if it's the right thing to do, sorry.
 

Alastair

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Thanks. Those eggs are layed by laying workers not a queen.

Either you do not have a queen, or if there is she is not functioning. So allow the queen cells to hatch and become the new queen.
 

StephenB

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Alastair is properly correct but it is not always the case.

New Queens often lay multiple eggs in a cells as well until they get into the rhythm of egg laying
 


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