NZBF: Treatments - How soon or too soon?

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Josh

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I've finally let the advice on here sink in, and giving up on OA/GLY until I’m better at the basics.

My autumn treatment is going to be Bayvrol (unless someone suggests otherwise) and I don’t plan on taking any honey this year (fat strong hive for winter to split next year).

Is it possible to put the treatment in too early, or should I do a mite count and wait for that that instead?

The books describe, harvest off and treatment in. But don’t allow for no yield.
 

tommy dave

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Yes, it is possible to put the treatment in too early. The reason for this is that, for example, if you put in an Autumn treatment now then by the time late summer/autumn rolls around it is likely that you will have moderate and increasing varroa levels again. This would require another treatment before winter.

Definitely a good idea to do a mite count, and monitor mite levels. In Christchurch I'd guess that putting in strips around mid-march would be best, however christchurch locals may have a different opinion :)

You mention splitting. If the hive is strong now then splitting now is another option - however that's dependent on what your goals are.
 

Mummzie

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There is no simple answer for treating for mites. It depends on the mite level in the hive, the chances of re-infestation, the winter conditions and.. and ...
ie. If you treat early...say now....8 weeks treatment will be out early March. There are still a few brood cycles before winter and you risk going into a warm winter with a level of mites.
If you have a mite issue now, it would pay to treat (oa/gl is good for now), but bear in mind the need to do another later.

Reinfestation would be a very real risk with an early treatment and if you have hives around you that are not getting treated until later.

A split now, especially if using a cell, would give a period of brood break for one hive at least- reducing the mite buildup.
 
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maungaturoto
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the above is absolutely correct. doing mite counts is best, but also keeping an eye on what the hive is doing. if the hive is reducing due to end of honey flow then you can very quickly run into mite issues.

the other is with splitting it all depends on what you call a "fat strong hive". most beginners seriously over estimate a hives strength.
this is where you really need to go see a good beeks hives.
 
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Christchurch has weather simlilar to some parts of the UK where I am; What many beekeepers do here is to treat in, around August (So March for you). This removes most of the mites and allows for the colony to rid iteslf of the viruses that are vectored by varroa before winter sets in; so you have a colony will a low disease level. Many of us also treat with Oxalic Acid (dribbling or vaporizing) in mid-winter which catches any colonies that have a high amount of varroa - say by robbing a failing colony.
Note that varroa became resistant to Bayvarol in the UK some years back - something to watch out for and not use it year in year out and rotate with other treatments.
 
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Sailabee

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If you have a lot of hives around you, treating too early opens your hive/s to re-infestation from surrounding hives still to treat. Personally, I prefer Apivar in autumn, as it is a 10 week treatment, so longer slower acting, and Bayvarol in spring, as while not recommended, you can in an emergency put supers on with Bayvarol still finishing in a hive.
 
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frazzledfozzle

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Personally, I prefer Apivar in autumn, as it is a 10 week treatment, so longer slower acting, and Bayvarol in spring, as while not recommended, you can in an emergency put supers on with Bayvarol still finishing in a hive.

I go with Dr Mark Goodwin’s advice and that is to use Apivar in Spring because it’s slower acting and in Spring the increase in bee numbers outruns the increase in mites for a time.

Bayvarol in Autumn because it has a quick knockdown.
The hive has varroa from being untreated over the honey flow and at the same time is reducing in bee numbers meaning a higher ratio of mites to bees
 

Timw

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I go with Dr Mark Goodwin’s advice and that is to use Apivar in Spring because it’s slower acting and in Spring the increase in bee numbers outruns the increase in mites for a time.

Bayvarol in Autumn because it has a quick knockdown.
The hive has varroa from being untreated over the honey flow and at the same time is reducing in bee numbers meaning a higher ratio of mites to bees
An autumn inspection of my 4 Warres sugar shake revealed <4 in 3 hives and 55 in one (and a poorer brood pattern not surprisingly). I’ve used OAV till now but on the 55 I’ve relented from my reluctance to use miticides and put in Bayvarol. Question- should I continue with 2 weekly OAV in conjunction with bayvarol- is there any downside - or just leave the bayvarol and check in 6-8 was?
 
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maungaturoto
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Question- should I continue with 2 weekly OAV in conjunction with bayvarol- is there any downside - or just leave the bayvarol and check in 6-8 was?
bayvarol only. OA will cause more damage which will kill off the hive. as it is, its highly unlikely that the hive will even survive.
 
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Well there yah go. I'm totally opposite to Frazz. We seeem to be in the groove of O/A in the spring, and Apivar in the autumn.
Why ....
O/A is cheap and works .... sort of ..... so in the spring when we get around the bees every 21 days we can pick up any issues and sort them.
Apivar has a 13 week knockdown period, which from my point of view is great beacause we can walk away and concentrate on extracting, and of course it protects the hives for a longer period if our neighbours are a bit lax at treating.
 
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