NZBF: Tutin contamination in Gisborne.

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2
0
Gisborne
Experience
Hobbyist
Hello everyone, this is my first post. I'm a beginner beekeeper living in Wainui, Gisborne.
At the moment I have 3 Technoset hives, with happy bees that are not showing any Varroa pressure so far. (used Apivar and Bayvarol)
I just wanted to share that our first year of honey, today tested just above the limit for Tutin contamination.
We extracted 40 kilos, and the sample went to Gribbles Scientific, using the www.myhumm.co.nz service.
Sadly our honey contains 1.19mg/kg of Tutin. (limit is 0.7 mg/kg)
I'll be feeding it back to our bees, without supers, to ensure the Tutin doesn't find its way back.
Lesson learned, next extraction will be before the end of the year, and the honey supers will be installed from July onwards.

toxic_honey_tutin.jpg
 
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Reactions: Trevor Gillbanks
8,630
5,089
maungaturoto
Experience
Commercial
first thing is AFB 101, do not feed honey to bees.
plus where are the bees going to store it? you will need a super on and then you have tutin in next seasons honey.
so you need to get rid of it another way.

this is where local knowledge is valuable. the locals will know when to take honey off to avoid tutin.
 
3,505
6,547
Hawkes Bay
Experience
Commercial
Your honey is over the limit so you can't sell it or even give it away but you can eat it yourself. The limit is set at 100 times lower than what could cause any harm to anybody and your level is lower than the limit that we used to have a few years ago ( 2.). Honey that was packed under the old limit was still allowed to be sold until it was used up so it is pretty obvious even MPI don't really believe that honey at this level is dangerous to anybody.
Don't get me wrong tutin contamination is dangerous and at high levels can make you very sick or even kill you but this is not a high level and I would be more than happy to have it on my sandwiches. You do have the option if you have some honey with no tutin to blend them together until the entire lot is below the set limit.
Honey taken off before 1 January does not need to be tested but I know for a fact that honeys can be over the legal limit before this date.
Where I have hives levels have been very low this year or non-existent and I suspect in general it's has been a good year for low readings. Some years have certainly been a lot worse than this one and will be again.
 
2
0
Gisborne
Experience
Hobbyist
Your honey is over the limit so you can't sell it or even give it away but you can eat it yourself. The limit is set at 100 times lower than what could cause any harm to anybody and your level is lower than the limit that we used to have a few years ago ( 2.). Honey that was packed under the old limit was still allowed to be sold until it was used up so it is pretty obvious even MPI don't really believe that honey at this level is dangerous to anybody.
Don't get me wrong tutin contamination is dangerous and at high levels can make you very sick or even kill you but this is not a high level and I would be more than happy to have it on my sandwiches. You do have the option if you have some honey with no tutin to blend them together until the entire lot is below the set limit.
Honey taken off before 1 January does not need to be tested but I know for a fact that honeys can be over the legal limit before this date.
Where I have hives levels have been very low this year or non-existent and I suspect in general it's has been a good year for low readings. Some years have certainly been a lot worse than this one and will be again.
Thank you John, I will store it and aim for blending it with the future production after winter (and enjoy some on toast while we wait, I've had some and it's really nice). It's great to learn more, I really appreciate your input, will share how it goes in the future. Have a great rest of the week and summer.
 
8,630
5,089
maungaturoto
Experience
Commercial
I am sure feeding the honey back to the hives they came from, over winter is a zero AFB risk
its not just about risk, its about learning bad habits.
how do you think a lot of these people with AFB problems get that way? a lot of it is simply that they have learnt to do things poorly.
doing things properly from day one goes a long way to making sure your not the ***** who spread AFB around the neighbourhood.
 

StephenB

Banned
199
85
New Zealand
Experience
Commercial
its not just about risk, its about learning bad habits.
how do you think a lot of these people with AFB problems get that way? a lot of it is simply that they have learnt to do things poorly.
doing things properly from day one goes a long way to making sure your not the ***** who spread AFB around the neighbourhood.
Thats right people need to know what the rules are, how to manage bees etc and how to filter out the misinformation
 
384
286
Mid Canterbury
Experience
Semi Commercial
Thats right people need to know what the rules are, how to manage bees etc and how to filter out the misinformation
I agree with this sentiment.


Hi Wainui Waves - I think you have made the easiest to implement choice out of the two options. You can also use your honey in cooking.

Also suggest you get the yellow book at most beekeeping suppliers or AFB Recognition Course Info | The Management Agency, National American Foulbrood Pest Management Plan New Zealand and by a copy of Practical Beekeeping in NZ

If you were to feed honey to hives, yes make sure it is the hives it came from, and as a beginner this easiest in cooler months. You want to avoid robbing (aggressive bee foraging behaviour). If you don't understand this concept, google it. For a beginner, once robbing starts it is difficult to stop.

You are living in a tutin area, therefore it would be a very good idea to find a local network of beekeepers. I know this could be difficult in these Covid times, (another reasons to read up on things) but some clubs are quite technologically savvy. Perhaps find another beekeeper at the same stage as yourself and the two of you can "grow together"
 

Morporks

Banned
100
51
New Zealand
Experience
Commercial
I agree with this sentiment.


Hi Wainui Waves - I think you have made the easiest to implement choice out of the two options. You can also use your honey in cooking.

Also suggest you get the yellow book at most beekeeping suppliers or AFB Recognition Course Info | The Management Agency, National American Foulbrood Pest Management Plan New Zealand and by a copy of Practical Beekeeping in NZ

If you were to feed honey to hives, yes make sure it is the hives it came from, and as a beginner this easiest in cooler months. You want to avoid robbing (aggressive bee foraging behaviour). If you don't understand this concept, google it. For a beginner, once robbing starts it is difficult to stop.

You are living in a tutin area, therefore it would be a very good idea to find a local network of beekeepers. I know this could be difficult in these Covid times, (another reasons to read up on things) but some clubs are quite technologically savvy. Perhaps find another beekeeper at the same stage as yourself and the two of you can "grow together"
This is the correct answer to your question
 


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