Wingless Queen

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Mummzie

Staff member
Gold
1,115
991
Tasman
Experience
Hobbyist
I found this today, from a graft on 23 Feb.
Are there any possible other causes than DWV?

How is Deformed Wing Virus transmitted?
Does it come via the egg / the sperm / or the feeding

WG2.jpg Wingless Q.jpg
 

Alastair

Founder Member
8,174
9,409
Auckland
Experience
Semi Commercial
Yes very sad, sometimes we do get these beautiful queens emerge from the cell but no wings, and sadly they will never mate.

It can be caused by mishandling of the queen cell, ie, if the larva is jiggled around when the wings are still being formed they can be damaged. But it is nearly always caused by DWV.

DWV can be transmitted by all the ways you say, but primarily by varroa mites. It is said that varroa mites do not go into queen cells but I know that isn't true because on several occasions when examining unused queen cells I have found varroa in the cell with the queen larva.
 
23
14
Russia
Experience
International
The photo clearly shows the wing deformity virus.. You have a very besmirched colony. The critical number of 2600-3000 ticks per colony. The virus is transmitted through ticks that parasitize in the cell, and bees infected with this virus can transmit this virus to the larvae along with food. Also, ticks that are not infected receive this virus through an infected larva.
 
1
0
texas
Experience
Commercial
The photo clearly shows the wing deformity virus.. You have a very besmirched colony. The critical number of 2600-3000 ticks per colony. The virus is transmitted through ticks that parasitize in the cell, and bees infected with this virus can transmit this virus to the larvae along with food. Also, ticks that are not infected receive this virus through an infected larva.
so is there any kind of vaccine available in market for this virus??
 


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