Apiculture New Zealand new strategy

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This came out today and I have to say for my initial reading it looks like something designed to help out the shaky bottom lines of the corporations and hugely increase cost to the ordinary beekeeper.I have a lot more reading to do but little gems like the compulsory reporting of varoa stand out as an expensive bureaucratic nightmare. Every hive in New Zealand has varoa. Compulsory treatment using only approved products might have got my support 20 years ago when we were trying to slow down or stop resistance but that boat has sailed.
Thank you in advance for someone more technically capable than me that can post the actual article.
 
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thats the doc for varroa.

treatment with approved products is the law now. good thing is they made some basic stuff (eg oxalic acid) legal for use.
compulsory treatment i think might be a good thing. won't make any difference to hobby beeks, but it might put the squeeze on big commercials dumping hives and letting them die out.

monitoring for resistance would be a good thing, but i suspect thats going to very quickly run into issues with certain big chem companies.

the really good thing is putting money into research. that is where we will have a big gain. people have been calling for that for quite some time.
do more varroa treatment research.
 

Alastair

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Was this designed by an actual beekeeper?

I do not see how out there in the field, there would be compliance by a big enough % of beekeepers to make it work.

Beekeepers are by nature innovative, inventors, and experimenters. That is how oxalic acid and other treatments were developed. My view there will be a sizeable portion of the beekeeping community who will see being told how to treat their mites as being straitjacketed and won't follow the program.

In addition, I see hives being lost to mites as natural deselection of poor beekeepers.
 
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hopefully it's attached ok.

I agree with John, it sure looks like added support for anyone producing Manuka. It's also dirty that the financial support was partly provided big C and MH. C also sits on APINZ. I would love to know the membership makeup of APINZ and see how many are manuka producers, I bet quite a few. The APINZ board has a strong Manuka agenda.
And Dennis, why are you still on the board. What's your role now?? Sold your bees.

Focus is on adding value and protecting Manuka honey.
I do pollination, and the report shows that pollination income is just 40M odd. Compared to 500M odd for manuka.
What the report fails to highlight is the actual value of pollination. What does my business generate in future growth?
All pollination is adding billions of dollars to our economy. And necessary for food production.
Manuka is not necessary.

Yet again, very disheartening and somewhat angry.
I am not a conspiracy kind of guy but I get to thinking that support is focused on big business.
 

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  • NZ Honey Strategy 2024-2030 FINAL 20th Feb 2024 Copy.pdf
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Just out of interest did their extensive consultation include anyone on the forum . It certainly didn't include all their members as I am one and don't recall any consultation.
Gino is right in that it seems to totally ignore pollination whereas the reality is far as New Zealand's economy is concerned is that honey is a relatively unimportant byproduct compared to the value of pollination and in many areas the vital pollination of clover has been seriously compromised by existing beekeepers being driven out of business by corporate type manuka producers flooding their areas with huge numbers of hives and making honey production non-viable and yet when hives are needed to pollinate the clover they are not there. As for doubling the value I find it hard to see how something that is already overhyped, overpriced and oversupplied is going to do anything but decrease in price. That is a market reality.
Initially getting good money for manuka was a godsend to New Zealand beekeepers but in the end it led to huge problems not the least of which is the total fragmentation of the beekeeping industry and the lack of trust and animosity between beekeepers that is now the norm.
In the last few years I have seen a mellowing of some of the problems and more willingness to cooperate but I can't see this doing anything but make things worse again.
 
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thats the doc for varroa.

treatment with approved products is the law now. good thing is they made some basic stuff (eg oxalic acid) legal for use.
compulsory treatment i think might be a good thing. won't make any difference to hobby beeks, but it might put the squeeze on big commercials dumping hives and letting them die out.

monitoring for resistance would be a good thing, but i suspect thats going to very quickly run into issues with certain big chem companies.

the really good thing is putting money into research. that is where we will have a big gain. people have been calling for that for quite some time.
do more varroa treatment research.
apologizes, i looked at the wrong thing.

https://nzbeekeeping.co.nz/wp-conte...ey-Strategy-2024-2030-FINAL-20th-Feb-2024.pdf if you can't see the attachment gino has.
 
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Just out of interest did their extensive consultation include anyone on the forum . It certainly didn't include all their members as I am one and don't recall any consultation.
Gino is right in that it seems to totally ignore pollination whereas the reality is far as New Zealand's economy is concerned is that honey is a relatively unimportant byproduct compared to the value of pollination and in many areas the vital pollination of clover has been seriously compromised by existing beekeepers being driven out of business by corporate type manuka producers flooding their areas with huge numbers of hives and making honey production non-viable and yet when hives are needed to pollinate the clover they are not there. As for doubling the value I find it hard to see how something that is already overhyped, overpriced and oversupplied is going to do anything but decrease in price. That is a market reality.
Initially getting good money for manuka was a godsend to New Zealand beekeepers but in the end it led to huge problems not the least of which is the total fragmentation of the beekeeping industry and the lack of trust and animosity between beekeepers that is now the norm.
In the last few years I have seen a mellowing of some of the problems and more willingness to cooperate but I can't see this doing anything but make things worse again.

i agree a fair bit of that.

"2030 goal
To double NZ honey export value, increase consumer engagement with mānuka
honey, and New Zealand’s honey reputation* by 2030."

i think thats barking up the wrong tree to start with. everyone around the world knows nz manuka. increasing engagement is not required. getting out there and selling it is a different story.
also focusing on only one product smacks of the honey board era and has always been a failure point for any industry.
something i mentioned to one of our big overseas buyers, we have a wide range of the worlds best honeys that we should be pushing, not just manuka.

however having a united industry is long overdue and is mandatory for going forward. we run a very large risk of sliding back into a poor mans industry.
so we kinda need to be like the old hone6y board, but without all the failings.

having a PMP for varroa is not a bad idea. its a big cost, cost to production and we could do with extra rules like not letting hives die from varroa and causing issues to everyone else. it should be easy enough to bundle that with the AFB PMP. it could well improve nz bee health.

making local honey production use the same rules as the export is a way of dealing with the grey export problems. help stop fraudulent honey sales to tourists. however a lot of small producers will be very upset.

the big thing is being able to fund research. we are never going to get better if we don't improve and we have a long bad history of almost no one wanting to do the research, then jumping on the bandwagon after someone has done it.
we need to be far more proactive in making new markets, new products and ways to improve beekeeping.

unfortunately us kiwis have a history of "minimal expenditure but minimal income". for eg its in the media at the moment with all the infrastructure costs while most kiwis have had it easy not paying tax/rates/levies over the decades, and now it biting us in the rear.
it seams many beeks have the same mentality, don't want to pay anything and therefore miss out on making the money.
time we stood on our own two feet.
 
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All pollination is adding billions of dollars to our economy.
The hort industry will argue, and with some merit, that pollination is a small part of the bigger picture and all the extra income earned is not attributed to pollination.
And Dennis, why are you still on the board. What's your role now?? Sold your bees
I am still an APINZ member, as I have paid a sub until the new season rolls around.
I have stood down from the board, but I am happy to be consulted if needed until the new season comes around; they just haven't replaced my spot on the board and will make a decision if they want to before the AGM rolls around.
 
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The hort industry will argue, and with some merit, that pollination is a small part of the bigger picture and all the extra income earned is not attributed to pollination.


So your saying that if we don't put bees into say kiwifruit it'll have minimal affect
on the quality, value and price of kiwis,?
Geez may as well quit.
I think you represent manuka as well.
 
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So your saying that if we don't put bees into say kiwifruit it'll have minimal affect
on the quality, value and price of kiwis,?
Geez may as well quit.
I think you represent manuka as well

No, Im saying, as you well know, that there is a lot more that goes into earning a dollar from (anything) than just 1 input.
Never been an advocate for manuka alone, but the facts don't lie, it out performs all other bee related incomes combined, so build on that.
Just as the gold kiwifruit brings in more $$$, same with sav for the wine industry, etc etc etc.
 

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I thought the plan was kind of on track, it's about getting our product sold, and getting value for it. Pollination? Well that is worth whatever a beekeeper is prepared to accept for it, and not a lot APINZ can do about that.

The main thing I wasn't happy with was the proposed varroa policy on 2 grounds. 1. Good compliance will be near enough impossible to enforce. Our continuing AFB problem shows that as a community we are not complying with either good practice, or the regulations, and with varroa it will be even several orders of magnitude harder to get enough compliance than it is with AFB. And 2. Allowing people to experiment will from time to time bring a new innovation.
 
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How do you think they would do that and how would it change anything?

Beekeepers already set the price for pollination.
By saying how important bees are for pollination.
Just as the do with manuka man.
The big reason for this report is increasing bottom line returns for manuka. The big guns are struggling to get top dollar, probably because smaller companies are eating at their margins.

Its hardly a thriving together report is it.
It's a double our manuka money report.
As Tristan pointed out, if it flies then we're back to screwing each other for manuka.
 
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Hi, but the thriving together proposal is fully manuka focused.
yes, and i think thats stupid. however i can understand it a bit as it looks good for know nothing politicians.

however, comvita just posted a half year loss.
lots of the industry are going bust, big hive reductions, big loss in beeks, yet the industry pulls in 400+ million dollars in manuka sales alone. the highest income in the world on honey but nz beeks are not making profit. somethings really fishy.
yet they want to keep focus on manuka. thats insane. why would you focus on something your loosing money on.

a big part of the loss is because beeks compete with beeks for the same thing and they all loose because of it.
reminds me of the old story of gold miners. in the gold rush the gold miners didn't get rich, but the side trades/businesses did.
 
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The big guns are struggling to get top dollar, probably because smaller companies are eating at their margins.
no, not by a long shot. lots of small companies have closed or downsized.
the simple problem is beeks where not making the profit they should have been. drop in price and now there is nothing for the beek.
also keep in mind the customers set the price, not the beeks.
 
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I thought the plan was kind of on track, it's about getting our product sold, and getting value for it. Pollination? Well that is worth whatever a beekeeper is prepared to accept for it, and not a lot APINZ can do about that.
actually its the customer that dictates the price. growers will only pay so much. that in turn is countered by what the beek thinks is worthwhile. the attitude to pollination for some crops is pretty dismal. apinz can do something about that.

The main thing I wasn't happy with was the proposed varroa policy on 2 grounds. 1. Good compliance will be near enough impossible to enforce. Our continuing AFB problem shows that as a community we are not complying with either good practice, or the regulations, and with varroa it will be even several orders of magnitude harder to get enough compliance than it is with AFB. And 2. Allowing people to experiment will from time to time bring a new innovation.
yes but i think it would still be worthwhile. frankly i would not expect it to be used all that much. its a case of having the framework there so it can be used.
things like allowing experimentation, that should be easy enough to apply for a permit for. that in it self could help because now you know who is trying what and they can help each other out. it could help to bring beeks together.
 
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