Neighbour Notification for pesticide application- How far is reasonable?

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KATIKATI
Experience
Non Beekeeper
Hi Members.
New to the Forum.
I am looking for ways I can reduce environmental impact of my Drone spraying business. I am about to operate in the BOP (surrounded by orchards and lifestyle blocks) and my aim is to develop practical strategies around protecting local hive activity as much as possible.

I suppose my first question to you would be during my Neighbour Notification process, how far do I spread the notification (1000m perimeter reasonable)? Would time of season play a part in how far I should notify?
 
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yesbut

Staff member
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6,713
Nelson
Experience
Hobbyist
Welcome to the forum Ian, and a big thank you for asking ! The single big issue is that beekeepers cannot control where their bees forage.
Foraging can range several kms quite easily, according to the floral resource available at the time. Commercial beeks may have the option of moving their hives temporarily, hobbyist's/lifestylers can't. Toxicity to foraging bees of chemicals dried on a flower is one item, the other is toxic surfactants in the aerosol affecting flying bees.....other input will be along shortly....
 
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179
253
Bay of Plenty
Experience
Commercial
Hi Members.
New to the Forum.
I am looking for ways I can reduce environmental impact of my Drone spraying business. I am about to operate in the BOP (surrounded by orchards and lifestyle blocks) and my aim is to develop practical strategies around protecting local hive activity as much as possible.

I suppose my first question to you would be during my Neighbour Notification process, how far do I spread the notification (1000m perimeter reasonable)? Would time of season play a part in how far I should notify?
Need more info on what and where and who for, you spraying
 
3,342
6,177
Hawkes Bay
Experience
Commercial
I have had many hundreds of hives poisoned over the years by insecticides and surfactants. Having said that, spray poisoning is nowhere near as common as it used to be and most people behave responsible with their sprays these days.
It is of course illegal to spray insecticides onto flowering plants that may be visited by bees and this includes flowering weeds in places like orchards. I have on occasions been asked to move bees because of spraying but I now have a fix policy of refusing to move hives as if spraying is done according to law it will not cause me any problems. My worst losses have been caused by gorse being sprayed. The herbicide is not toxic to the bees but unfortunately organo- silicate surfactants are deadly whether wet or dry and this is not listed on the label. Other surfactants are toxic to bees if they are sprayed directly with them but otherwise are relatively harmless.
It is best practice to spray any plants either before or after they have flowered and that really removes any risks involved.
Thank you for taking the time to ask this important question. If spraying absolutely has to happen then early morning and late evening of the best times to avoid too much contact with bees. Under no circumstances should sprays be applied over or immediately around beehives and this includes herbicide such as roundup as they can contaminate honey and cause problems with residues.
 

Alastair

Founder Member
Platinum
7,988
9,191
Auckland
Experience
Semi Commercial
Thanks for being so conscientious.

In my view notifying everyone within a km is overkill, the only people likely to be affected would be beekeepers, but within a circle that big around your operation there is likely to be somebody who will raise some baseless objection and make your life hard.

Me, I just ask people who approach me about spraying near my hives to not spray flowering plants, if you can manage that, you will do well. Sometimes it is unavoidable though for example gorse which can be flowering all the time, or, weeds under the target species. In such cases you could attempt to notify nearby beekeepers, or, attempt to avoid overuse of surfactants. You could also seek feedback from them afterwards so you can discover what works and what doesn't work.

Bottom line though, weed control has to be done. Beekeepers have to be able to go about their business but so do the people who need weeds controlled. My own experience is that I have had no hives poisoned that I am aware of for many years, I think that most people use weed spray responsibly and co existence between beekeepers and weed sprayers is going reasonably well over the last couple of decades.
 
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3
3
KATIKATI
Experience
Non Beekeeper
Appreciate your replies Guys,

Most of my operations at this point are gorse and woolly nightshade which is endemic in the bay.
My Job Hazard Analysis when identifying Hives is for Morn/Evening spraying (with Apiarist notification).

Wasn't aware that dry organosilicone is just as nasty as the wet...

I am looking at a Spray oil Adjuvant which may be less aggressive to replace need for organosilicone.

I know what you mean Alister around neighbours...
At one point I was working for Downer ground spraying kerb and channel on the road berms and some people would get very agitated around the use of glyphosate. They would engage me in the street to debate it's use, or warn me away from their properties ( when I was even 30m away).
 
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Reactions: Grant
3
3
KATIKATI
Experience
Non Beekeeper
I have had many hundreds of hives poisoned over the years by insecticides and surfactants. Having said that, spray poisoning is nowhere near as common as it used to be and most people behave responsible with their sprays these days.
It is of course illegal to spray insecticides onto flowering plants that may be visited by bees and this includes flowering weeds in places like orchards. I have on occasions been asked to move bees because of spraying but I now have a fix policy of refusing to move hives as if spraying is done according to law it will not cause me any problems. My worst losses have been caused by gorse being sprayed. The herbicide is not toxic to the bees but unfortunately organo- silicate surfactants are deadly whether wet or dry and this is not listed on the label. Other surfactants are toxic to bees if they are sprayed directly with them but otherwise are relatively harmless.
It is best practice to spray any plants either before or after they have flowered and that really removes any risks involved.
Thank you for taking the time to ask this important question. If spraying absolutely has to happen then early morning and late evening of the best times to avoid too much contact with bees. Under no circumstances should sprays be applied over or immediately around beehives and this includes herbicide such as roundup as they can contaminate honey and cause problems with residues.
I had this report forwarded to me that may be of interest..........................
 

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  • EFFECT OF SURFACTANTS ON HONEY BEE SURVIVAL.pdf
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3,342
6,177
Hawkes Bay
Experience
Commercial
I have had 50 hives between two apiarys killed by organo silicone surfactants used to spray gorse . I don't blame the spray operators as the surfactants are not labelled as toxic to bees. Numerous attempts have been made to persuade MPI to do something about this problem and as far as I'm concerned they are responsible as they continue to ignore the issue.
 


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