Oxalic acid dribble

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34
51
Bay of plenty
Experience
Commercial
As we rapidly head towards the end of the season and low brood levels in a year that might have severe reinvaision and maybe even some resistance to synthetic strips I am starting to think about doing a quick oxalic dribble treatment. In the past I have used the standard sugar based solution however i understand that oxalic can also be dissolved in a water and glycerin solution for a dribble treatment.

Does anyone have any views or experience with this???
 
3,342
6,177
Hawkes Bay
Experience
Commercial
You can legally use a sugar and oxalic acid dribble but using glycerin is a legal grey area. Yes I know that lots of people are using oxalic strips with glycerin but from my inquiries it is a very grey area and while you would probably get away with it with no problems you might just not..
 
34
51
Bay of plenty
Experience
Commercial
Oxalic in a glycerin and water solution used as a dribble is a newish idea compared to using a sugar solution which has been done for about 30 years.
The idea is that the bees are not tempted to consume any of the glycerin solution and are less damaged by the treatment.
 

Grant

Staff member
Founder Member
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John is referring to this discussion

On 12/01/2019 at 4:04 PM, john berry said:


I raised the question of legality with apiculture New Zealand, New Zealand beekeeping and MPI many months ago. MPI initially told me that it was not legal and then changed their mind which does not inspire much confidence. My initial enquiry to MPI was over the legality of glycerin but they have never replied to me on that one. Oxalic acid is legal but like all things these days its legality depends on MPI's interpretation of the law. Given the number of people that have been using strips for some time there doesn't seem to be much doubt that it is an efficacious treatment but what we need is some rigourous scientific trials to show what residue levels these treatments cause. You have to remember that whether it's harmless or not still doesn't mean you will be allowed to use it or that importing countries will accept it. Common sense does not necessarily apply and you have no Monsanto pushing this product from behind.

My interpretation of what MPI told me and it is only my interpretation is that you can mix it and use Oxalic yourself but you have to also ensure that residues are within accepted levels but no one knows what those levels are. As for glycerin I hope either apiculture New Zealand or New Zealand beekeeping has been able to get an answer out of MPI because I can't.
 
50
29
Katikati
Experience
Commercial
As we rapidly head towards the end of the season and low brood levels in a year that might have severe reinvaision and maybe even some resistance to synthetic strips I am starting to think about doing a quick oxalic dribble treatment. In the past I have used the standard sugar based solution however i understand that oxalic can also be dissolved in a water and glycerin solution for a dribble treatment.

Does anyone have any views or experience with this???

I used that recipe yesterday on a handful of ICU hives. Worked well. Lots of mite fall over 24hr.
The solution was quite a bit thinner than syrup base.
400ml glyc, plus 600ml h2o. .
I think I'll dribble mind on treatment coming out
 
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Reactions: Fieldbee (Mary)
18
22
Whakatane
Experience
Commercial
Oxalic in a glycerin and water solution used as a dribble is a newish idea compared to using a sugar solution which has been done for about 30 years.
The idea is that the bees are not tempted to consume any of the glycerin solution and are less damaged by the treatment.
Hubby asked how is it moved around the hives if done this way. Does it just evaporate and reach the varroa that way.
Please excuse our ignorance. As we use oxalyic staples and it works by the bees rubbing on the saples which uspsets the mites it is moved around the hive by the bees bodies.
 
50
29
Katikati
Experience
Commercial
Oxalic in a glycerin and water solution used as a dribble is a newish idea compared to using a sugar solution which has been done for about 30 years.
The idea is that the bees are not tempted to consume any of the glycerin solution and are less damaged by the treatment.
Hey, you try the glycerine option yet??
 


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