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Josh

Gold
836
585
Christchurch
Experience
Hobbyist
Hey appreciate some thoughts.

Quick bit of advice, a nuc of mine (2 weeks old) is laying up a storm. 6 frames of happy calm bees. Slowly drawing comb. But zero stores. I’m thinking it needs a feed, or is it just using everything that’s coming in?

Other full size hives in the same apiary have nectar/honey coming in.
 

Otto

Gold
74
164
Dunedin
Experience
Semi Commercial
I'd advise the opposite. Feed them.
The last thing you want is to set them back because they run out of food.
There's a big difference between a nuc trying to expand and a full strength hive with respect to their ability to collect surplus nectar. Really strong hives are almost always fine but (especially at this time of the year) nucs tend to immediately convert every bit of food into brood. This makes them vulnerable to being set back by a lack of food if the weather is uncooperative, even only for a few days. Always better if they have some spare for a rainy day.
 

Josh

Gold
836
585
Christchurch
Experience
Hobbyist
I somehow knew I'd get both sides of the coin asking a question like this on here.

Thanks for the explanation @Otto. The hive is drawing out frames well, and I suspect they are using everything to make wax & brood. Also the queen drops an egg in every cell as they become available (Bodes well for the new hive), and there are no cells free for nectar even if they had spare.

I should have saved some drawn comb for such an occasion, but all my comb was old and dark or completely destroyed by wax moth (too warm this winter)

I forgot to explain this nuc is two boxes of 5 frames each (stacked obviously) and only been in existance 2 weeks.

The forecast for the next week is good, I'm going to give them 1 week. And take a feeder and syrup with me next visit, give them some help. ie split the advice to a week each 😂
 

Josh

Gold
836
585
Christchurch
Experience
Hobbyist
It's moments like these I wish I had a keeper in my back pocket, boot, bag, or beer fridge, that I could pop out when I'm looking in my hives and want some advice
 
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3
0
Takapuna
Experience
Hobbyist
I am opening up my struggling hive and popping a full frame of honey in right now.... thanks. Any ideas how I can reduce the wind velocity up there, they take off fine but coming back in to land seems to have high failure and they have to ''go around'' and get back into the holding pattern again? They are 5 meters above ground level.
IMG_1670.JPG
 
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Josh

Gold
836
585
Christchurch
Experience
Hobbyist
I am opening up my struggling hive and popping a full frame of honey in right now.... thanks. Any ideas how I can reduce the wind velocity up there, they take off fine but coming back in to land seems to have high failure and they have to ''go around'' and get back into the holding pattern again? They are 5 meters above ground level.
View attachment 996
That’s impressive. Up high to avoid bees buzzing past people? Or to brag to all your neighbours when the honey stack goes up?

I prevent bees buzzing past by putting a windbreak around my apiary, and after 5-10m they dissipate and you’d never know a hive was in the yard.
 

Mummzie

Staff member
Gold
1,114
990
Tasman
Experience
Hobbyist
Any ideas how I can reduce the wind velocity up there, they take off fine but coming back in to land seems to have high failure and they have to ''go around'' and get back into the holding pattern again?
At ground level they often land on the ground and then make another flight to the entrance.
A windbreak to block the prevailing wind I guess- something like shade cloth?
 
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