Should disabled people be allowed to keep bees?

Welcome to NZ Beekeepers+
Would you like to join the rest of our members? Feel free to sign up today.
Sign up

Grant

Staff member
Founder Member
Platinum
10,257
4,791
The topic came up today about disabled people and if they should be allowed to keep bees within the practicalities of them being able to lift, be safe etc.
 
8,434
4,864
maungaturoto
Experience
Commercial
The topic came up today about disabled people and if they should be allowed to keep bees within the practicalities of them being able to lift, be safe etc.
best to let them decide.
i know one disabled guy who could probably lift a full FD single handed.
they will build suitable location so they can have access.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Grant

Mark Lawrence

Founder Member
Gold
31
48
Christchurch
Experience
Breeder
The topic came up today about disabled people and if they should be allowed to keep bees within the practicalities of them being able to lift, be safe etc.
Absolutely.
From my experience these people (and there are many definitions of "disabilities") are very innovative and/or have a lot of support around them. The joy of keeping bees should be available to everyone as long as it is being done correctly with bee health and disease being taken care of.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Grant

Bee2beeNZ

Gold
7
22
Auckland
Experience
Hobbyist
Top Bar hives, Long Hives and A-Z Hives are perfect for any body that cannot lift heavy boxes whether they are in a wheel chair, a mobility
scooter or just getting a bit old and cranky. Challenged people should not be excluded from the joys and pleasures of beekeeping!
 
  • Like
Reactions: Grant

Grant

Staff member
Founder Member
Platinum
10,257
4,791
Top Bar hives, Long Hives and A-Z Hives are perfect for any body that cannot lift heavy boxes whether they are in a wheel chair, a mobility
scooter or just getting a bit old and cranky. Challenged people should not be excluded from the joys and pleasures of beekeeping!
Ah good, someone has got around to my point. So here we are in a discussion where so far the consensus is unanimous. Disabled people should not be precluded from beekeeping. And here, in the post quoted, are some alternative methods to help achieve that goal.

So why, as a forum community, are we so quick to jump on the back of someone who is different or has an alternative approach?
We go to great lengths to say how we've done it for years this way so its the best or only way. Would that answer be different if you knew the posters circumstances. Do they really have to say "hey I'm disabled" to get a positive response or some constructive feedback? And if they do, then why? Why would your answer be different if you are being inclusive? Likewise, if they are not disabled, why would that change your answer?

Along the same lines, why do we jump on someone's writing style (or spelling). Initially we have no idea if they have a learning difference, or maybe dyslexia, fat fingers or perhaps they may even be blind and are using voice to text software to send their message. Some people type what they think as they are thinking it, so it may appear random or garbled, but does that mean its any less relevant? Sure its a pain in the arse and yes after you "get to know" a member you can determine if they are just being lazy but we are still making an assumption.

Of course, a given individual may or may not have any impairment. But who are we to judge behind our keyboards?
Lockdowns, shootings, earthquakes and peoples personal circumstances are all going to impact their view on life, not to mention their technical approach to the site, and lets not forget intonation and non verbal signals are lost in this format.

With covid we constantly hear the adage "be kind". But how many of us are? This site is not a reflection of me, its a reflection on you guys. It takes a community to make a community, so please lets start behaving like one.
 
8,434
4,864
maungaturoto
Experience
Commercial
So why, as a forum community, are we so quick to jump on the back of someone who is different or has an alternative approach?
We go to great lengths to say how we've done it for years this way so its the best or only way. Would that answer be different if you knew the posters circumstances. Do they really have to say "hey I'm disabled" to get a positive response or some constructive feedback? And if they do, then why? Why would your answer be different if you are being inclusive? Likewise, if they are not disabled, why would that change your answer?

one thing is there is simply different ways of doing things to get the same result, but they all have different downsides.
most things are a compromise.
like having a long hive because that is the only type of hive you can physically manage, but i would not recommend a long hive to most people because it has other major downsides, and there is better ways.
and yes they need to say they "are disabled" or live in a certain area, as the answers will be different to take in account the differences.
 


Top