Koss Russian bee setup

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131
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Russia
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Yes, we have that trait here in NZ also, just, not enough. It's only fairly recently it has become talked about as opposed to normal VSH where the larva is destroyed.
Imagine if you didn't have to treat bees for mites like in the good old days? Or reduce the amount of treatment to once a year?
I think you would reduce your costs of buying medicines that cost as much as a Boeing wing and there would be savings in labor costs, and your free time could be spent on more enjoyable activities when the bees do this work for you.
Treatment with chemicals leads over time to tick resistance to them. And in the long term this is a road to a dead end...
 
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Russia
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International
I will continue the topic about sacbrood. Subtotals.
A colony that I did not treat at all. She recovered on her own. I did not find any dead larvae.
I was never able to cure one colony. Even after press and isolating the queen. The dead larva still appeared in the brood. I have made the decision to replace the queen in this hive.
The other colonys, where the queens were isolated, feel well and show no signs of illness.
And now interesting conclusions.
Most likely there was only one sick sacbrood colony, and which I could not cure.
The remaining colonies simply showed the sign of recapping. I have one line that opens the brood at the larval stage rather than the pupa stage as usual.
That is, bees sense a mite in the brood, even when it has not yet begun to reproduce. Zero tolerance to ticks.
But there is a problem that some larvae die when open. This is not critical for the bee pupa. The humidity in the hive may have an effect. Don't know.
The photo shows a frame with the brood of one colony. Don't be alarmed. This colony was specifically infected with a tick. And in some cells there was a wax moth worm, so they are also open. The colony shows a response to infection. When she copes with the mite, the brood will be as usual.
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Alastair

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I notice most of the re-caps seem to be in clusters or lines, do you think much of it was due to varroa mites?
 
131
89
Russia
Experience
International
I notice most of the re-caps seem to be in clusters or lines, do you think much of it was due to varroa mites?
When the dissected brood appears in the shape of a line, it is more likely to be a reaction to a wax moth caterpillar. A definite answer can only be given by examination under a microscope. In general, an interesting question is by what criteria does a tick choose one cell and not another.
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